The Dogma of The Assumption

From the apostolic constitution Munificentissimus Deus by Pope Pius XII
Your body is holy and excelling in splendor

In their homilies and sermons on this feast the holy fathers and great doctors spoke of the assumption of the Mother of God as something already familiar and accepted by the faithful. They gave it greater clarity in their preaching and used more profound arguments in setting out its nature and meaning. Above all, they brought out more clearly the fact that what is commemorated in this feast is not simply the total absence of corruption from the dead body of the Blessed Virgin Mary but also her triumph over death and her glorification in heaven, after the pattern set by her only Son, Jesus Christ.

Thus Saint John Damascene, preeminent as the great preacher of this truth of tradition, speaks with powerful eloquence when he relates the bodily assumption of the loving Mother of God to her other gifts and privileges: “It was necessary that she who had preserved her virginity inviolate in childbirth should also have her body kept free from all corruption after death. It was necessary that she who had carried the Creator as a child on her breast should dwell in the tabernacles of God. It was necessary that the bride espoused by the Father should make her home in the bridal chambers of heaven. It was necessary that she, who had gazed on her crucified Son and been pierced in the heart by the sword of sorrow which she had escaped in giving him birth, should contemplate him seated with the Father. It was necessary that the Mother of God should share the possessions of her Son, and be venerated by every creature as the Mother and handmaid of God.”

Saint Germanus of Constantinople considered that it was in keeping not only with her divine motherhood but also with the unique sanctity of her virginal body that it was incorrupt and carried up to heaven: “In the words of Scripture, you appear in beauty. Your virginal body is entirely holy, entirely chaste, entirely the house of God, so that for this reason also it is henceforth a stranger to decay: a body changed, because a human body, to a preeminent life of incorruptibility, but still a living body, excelling in splendor, a body inviolate and sharing in the perfection of life.”

Another early author declares: “Therefore, as the most glorious Mother of Christ, our God and Savior, giver of life and immortality, she is enlivened by him to share an eternal incorruptibility of body with him who raised her from the tomb and took her up to himself in a way he alone can tell.”

All these reasonings and considerations of the holy Fathers rest on Scripture as their ultimate foundation. Scripture portrays the loving Mother of God, almost before our very eyes, as most intimately united with her divine Son and always sharing in his destiny.

Above all, it must be noted that from the second century the holy Fathers present the Virgin Mary as the new Eve, most closely associated with the new Adam, though subject to him in the struggle against the enemy from the nether world. This struggle, as the first promise of a redeemer implies, was to end in perfect victory over sin and death, always linked together in the writings of the Apostle of the Gentiles. Therefore, just as the glorious resurrection of Christ was an essential part of this victory and its final trophy, so the struggle shared by the Blessed Virgin and her Son was to end in glorification of her virginal body. As the same Apostle says: When this mortal body has clothed itself in immortality, then will be fulfilled the word of Scripture: Death is swallowed up in victory.

Hence, the august Mother of God, mysteriously united from all eternity with Jesus Christ in one and the same decree of predestination, immaculate in her conception, a virgin inviolate in her divine motherhood, the wholehearted companion of the divine Redeemer who won complete victory over sin and its consequences, gained at last the supreme crown of her privileges—to be preserved immune from the corruption of the tomb, and, like her Son, when death had been conquered, to be carried up body and soul to the exalted glory of heaven, there to sit in splendor at the right hand of her Son, the immortal King of the ages.

RESPONSORY

This is the glorious day, on which the Virgin Mother of God was taken up to heaven; let us sing these words in her praise:
— Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

Happy are you, holy Virgin Mary, and most worthy of all praise, from your womb Christ the Sun of Justice has risen.
— Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
— Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
— We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
— Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
— for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
— And we shall never hope in vain.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

O God, who,
looking on the lowliness of the Blessed Virgin Mary,
raised her to this grace,
that your Only Begotten Son was born of her according to the flesh
and that she was crowned this day with surpassing glory,
grant through her prayers,
that, saved by the mystery of your redemption,
we may merit to be exalted by you on high.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
— Amen.

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Maximilian Kolbe: Martyr of Charity

From the Letters of Maximilian Mary Kolbe
Apostolic zeal for the salvation and sanctification of souls

The burning zeal for God’s glory that motivates you fills my heart with joy. It is sad for us to see in our own time that indifferentism in its many forms is spreading like an epidemic not only among the laity but also among religious. But God is worthy of glory beyond measure, and therefore it is of absolute and supreme importance to seek that glory with all the power of our feeble resources. Since we are mere creatures we can never return to him all that is his due. The most resplendent manifestation of God’s glory is the salvation of souls, whom Christ redeemed by shedding his blood. To work for the salvation and sanctification of as many souls as possible, therefore, is the preeminent purpose of the apostolic life. Let me, then, say a few words that may show the way toward achieving God’s glory and the sanctification of many souls.

God, who is all-knowing and all-wise, knows best what we should do to increase his glory. Through his representatives on earth he continually reveals his will to us; thus it is obedience and obedience alone that is the sure sign to us of the divine will. A superior may, it is true, make a mistake; but it is impossible for us to be mistaken in obeying a superior’s command. The only exception to this rule is the case of a superior commanding something that in even the slightest way would contravene God’s law. Such a superior would not be conveying God’s will.

God alone is infinitely wise, holy, merciful, our Lord, Creator, and Father; he is beginning and end, wisdom and power and love; he is all. Everything other than God has value to the degree that it is referred to him, the maker of all and our own redeemer, the final end of all things. It is he who, declaring his adorable will to us through his representatives on earth, draws us to himself and whose plan is to draw others to himself through us and to join us all to himself in an ever deepening love.

Look, then, at the high dignity that by God’s mercy belongs to our state in life. Obedience raises us beyond the limits of our littleness and puts us in harmony with God’s will. In boundless wisdom and care, his will guides us to act rightly. Holding fast to that will, which no creature can thwart, we are filled with unsurpassable strength.

Obedience is the one and the only way of wisdom and prudence for us to offer glory to God. If there were another, Christ would certainly have shown it to us by word and example. Scripture, however, summed up his entire life at Nazareth in the words: He was subject to them; Scripture set obedience as the theme of the rest of his life, repeatedly declaring that he came into the world to do his Father’s will. Let us love our loving Father with all our hearts. Let our obedience increase that love, above all when it requires us to surrender our own will. Jesus Christ crucified is our sublime guide toward growth in God’s love.

We will learn this lesson more quickly through the Immaculate Virgin, whom God has made the dispenser of his mercy. It is beyond all doubt that Mary’s will represents to us the will of God himself. By dedicating ourselves to her we become in her hands instruments of God’s mercy even as she was such an instrument in God’s hands. We should let ourselves be guided and led by Mary and rest quiet and secure in her hands. She will watch out for us, provide for us, answer our needs of body and spirit; she will dissolve all our difficulties and worries.

RESPONSORY Ephesians 5:1-2; 6:6

Be imitators of God as his dear children. Follow the way of love, even as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as an offering to God.
— A gift of pleasing fragrance.

Do God’s will with your whole heart as servants of Christ.
— A gift of pleasing fragrance.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

O God,
who filled the Priest and Martyr Saint Maximilian Kolbe
with a burning love for the Immaculate Virgin Mary
and with zeal for souls and love of neighbor,
graciously grant, through his intercession,
that striving for your glory by eagerly serving others,
we may be conformed, even until death, to your Son.
Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
— Amen.

Taken from http://www.divineoffice.org August 14, 2017; feast of St. Maximilian Kolbe. Also, see Fr. James E. McCurry, OFM Conv. booklet titled Maximilian Kolbe: Martyr of Charity.

The Militia of Mary Immaculate

Crusade of Mary Immaculate (In Latin, Militia Immaculatae)

Pro amore usque ad victimam (For love even unto victimhood) – that inscription was handwritten in Latin by Fr. Maximilian in the local Mass register.

Why We Celebrate The Feast of The Assumption of Mary, Mother of God

THE ASSUMPTION OF MARY: A BELIEF SINCE APOSTOLIC TIMES
Father Clifford Stevens


The Assumption is the oldest feast day of Our Lady, but we don’t know how it first came to be celebrated.Its origin is lost in those days when Jerusalem was restored as a sacred city, at the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine (c. 285-337). By then it had been a pagan city for two centuries, ever since Emperor Hadrian (76-138) had leveled it around the year 135 and rebuilt it as <Aelia Capitolina> in honor of Jupiter.

For 200 years, every memory of Jesus was obliterated from the city, and the sites made holy by His life, death and Resurrection became pagan temples.

After the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 336, the sacred sites began to be restored and memories of the life of Our Lord began to be celebrated by the people of Jerusalem. One of the memories about his mother centered around the “Tomb of Mary,” close to Mount Zion, where the early Christian community had lived.

On the hill itself was the “Place of Dormition,” the spot of Mary’s “falling asleep,” where she had died. The “Tomb of Mary” was where she was buried.

At this time, the “Memory of Mary” was being celebrated. Later it was to become our feast of the Assumption.

For a time, the “Memory of Mary” was marked only in Palestine, but then it was extended by the emperor to all the churches of the East. In the seventh century, it began to be celebrated in Rome under the title of the “Falling Asleep” (“Dormitio”) of the Mother of God.

Soon the name was changed to the “Assumption of Mary,” since there was more to the feast than her dying. It also proclaimed that she had been taken up, body and soul, into heaven.

That belief was ancient, dating back to the apostles themselves. What was clear from the beginning was that there were no relics of Mary to be venerated, and that an empty tomb stood on the edge of Jerusalem near the site of her death. That location also soon became a place of pilgrimage. (Today, the Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition of Mary stands on the spot.)

At the Council of Chalcedon in 451, when bishops from throughout the Mediterranean world gathered in Constantinople, Emperor Marcian asked the Patriarch of Jerusalem to bring the relics of Mary to Constantinople to be enshrined in the capitol. The patriarch explained to the emperor that there were no relics of Mary in Jerusalem, that “Mary had died in the presence of the apostles; but her tomb, when opened later . . . was found empty and so the apostles concluded that the body was taken up into heaven.”

In the eighth century, St. John Damascene was known for giving sermons at the holy places in Jerusalem. At the Tomb of Mary, he expressed the belief of the Church on the meaning of the feast: “Although the body was duly buried, it did not remain in the state of death, neither was it dissolved by decay. . . . You were transferred to your heavenly home, O Lady, Queen and Mother of God in truth.”

All the feast days of Mary mark the great mysteries of her life and her part in the work of redemption. The central mystery of her life and person is her divine motherhood, celebrated both at Christmas and a week later (Jan. 1) on the feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8) marks the preparation for that motherhood, so that she had the fullness of grace from the first moment of her existence, completely untouched by sin. Her whole being throbbed with divine life from the very beginning, readying her for the exalted role of mother of the Savior.

The Assumption completes God’s work in her since it was not fitting that the flesh that had given life to God himself should ever undergo corruption. The Assumption is God’s crowning of His work as Mary ends her earthly life and enters eternity. The feast turns our eyes in that direction, where we will follow when our earthly life is over.

The feast days of the Church are not just the commemoration of historical events; they do not look only to the past. They look to the present and to the future and give us an insight into our own relationship with God. The Assumption looks to eternity and gives us hope that we, too, will follow Our Lady when our life is ended.

The prayer for the feast reads: “All-powerful and ever-living God: You raised the sinless Virgin Mary, mother of your Son, body and soul, to the glory of heaven. May we see heaven as our final goal and come to share her glory.”

In 1950, in the Apostolic Constitution <Munificentissimus Deus>, Pope Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption of Mary a dogma of the Catholic Church in these words: “The Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heaven.”

With that, an ancient belief became Catholic doctrine and the Assumption was declared a truth revealed by God.

Father Clifford Stevens writes from Tintern Monastery in Oakdale, Neb.


This article was taken from the July-August 1996 issue of “Catholic Heritage”. To subscribe write Our Sunday Visitor, Inc., 200 Noll Plaza, Huntington, IN 46750-9957 or call 1-800-348-2440. Published bimonthly at a charge of $18.00 per year.


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The Rosary: The Great Weapon of the 21st Century – A Brief History of The Rosary

I recommend purchasing this booklet which you can through the link below. It comes through America Needs Fatima, http://www.ANF.org.

In the booklet there is a more detailed article as to the history of the Rosary than the article in the links below provide. There is also a guide to praying the Rosary including all of the prayers, the litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary, along with other prayers and St. Louis de Montfort’s summary of the Life, Death and Glory of Jesus and Mary in the Holy Rosary, The Five First Saturday’s devotion, why the battle of Lepanto on October 7, 1571 was so important and the reason for Our Blessed Mother’s appearing in Fatima, Portugal in 1917 to the three shepherd children was also more important for our times, as well as the Fifteen Promises of Mary Most Holy to those who pray the Rosary.

Make no mistake about it and know that it makes perfect sense why God is sending his daughter, spouse and mother as His messenger in our times! God is Merciful before He is Just! Mary is Mother of Mercy among her numerous titles. When Jesus Christ comes again, it will be for the final Judgment, so that will be it! There will be no more time for Mercy! It will be Judgment! Hence, we need to heed the message of Our Blessed Mother at Fatima! She is the final message of God’s mercy and her Immaculate heart will triumph “before the great and terrible day of the Lord!”

You can read more by clicking on the two links below and you can purchase the booklet as well. It is worth purchasing the booklet and reading it, in my opinion. It’s a small booklet of only 46 pages and also contains beautiful images of artwork.

Dominus Vobiscum!!!

https://americaneedsfatima.org/The-Holy-Rosary/the-origin-of-the-rosary.html

http://www.ncregister.com/blog/joseph-pronechen/15-super-promises-of-our-blessed-mother-for-faithfully-praying-the-rosary

Oremus Communications August 2017 Newsletter

                               OREMUS COMMUNICATIONS AUGUST 2017 NEWSLETTER
     Hello Friends:  We continue to honor Our Lady of Fatima  in this 100th Anniversary Year of her visits to the 3 children, Lucia, Jacinta, and Francisco on 6 different occasions.   At this particular time,  we are, especially,  focused on her visit on August 19, 1917 wherein she requested again that we pray the Holy Rosary daily.
As before in our recent  newsletters, we refer to the book, “Fatima: The Full Story” by Fr.  John De  Marchi, I.M.C. and, specifically, page 105 for a more accurate synopsis of this 4th of the 6 apparitions.
As in the Cova da Iria only the three privileged children saw the celestial visitor.  In the designs of Providence, they and they alone were to be the instruments of the message ….
“Go again to the Cova da Iria on the 13th and continue to say the Rosary every day.”  Lucia again asked the Lady to perform a miracle that all might believe in her again.
“I will,” was the reply.  “In October, I will perform a miracle so that everyone can believe in the Apparitions.  If they had not taken you to Ourem, the miracle would have been greater.  St. Joseph will come with the Holy Child to bring peace to the world.
Our Lord will also come to bless the people.  Our Lady of the Rosary and Our Lady of Dolours will come too.”  Lucia, of course, did not forget the sick who had asked her to remember them to the Lady, and she fervently asked for their care.
“I will cure some during the year.” was the reply. (Sadly the Lady added) “Pray, pray very much and make sacrifices for sinners, for many souls go to hell because no one makes sacrifices for them.”  After this the Blessed Virgin took leave of her little friends and began to rise in the air in an eastward direction, leaving in the children’s souls a great longing for Heaven and a true hunger for the sacrifice that could save so many sinners.
     In conjunction with the above, we are very glad to have back on the OCFRP as our guest Co-Host on the 17th,  Mr. Carl Malburg, representing the International Pilgrim Virgin Statue Of Our Lady of Fatima Foundation.    Carl will be commenting on  these various aspects of the August 19 apparition  as well as on an array of related topics, such as the criteria needed for official church recognition of an apparition and why Our Blessed Mother appeared on the 19th of August instead of the 13th as was her custom on previous apparitions.
On another subject dear to the heart of Our Blessed Mother, we will be focusing on her Assumption into  heaven in our OCFRP on Tuesday,  August 15 with a special Novena Prayer .
This along with celebrating the Feast Day of our patron, St. Maximilian Kolbe on Monday, August 14th, and we have the makings for an intense week of  prayer.
To further assist us in these activities, we have once again as our guest Co-Host on the OCFRP, Fr. Peter Welsh from St. Helena Parish in North Philadelphia on Monday August 14;  followed by our renowned author friend,  Mr. Charles A. De Feo, O.P., who will join us on Wednesday, August 16.
We certainly hope that you and others can join us in prayer on these special dates as well as on other occasions throughout the weeks, as we continue to strive to make a spiritual difference.
OREMUS
p.s.  Visit our website at www.oremuscomms.com for details including how to “listen live” to our programs, and how to access the archived copies of each program.
Oremus Communications
email reply: oremuscomms@gmail.com
Phone: +1 (610) 869-3899
Fax: +1 (610) 345-5049